BIBLIOGRAPHY OF TAIWAN CINEMA

Compiled by Daw-Ming Lee (2016/08/24 updated)

1. GENERAL OVERVIEWS

Hong, Guo-Juin. Taiwan Cinema: A Contested Nation on Screen. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

An updated and comprehensive study of Taiwan cinema and its history. It discusses not only auteurs of Taiwan New Cinema (TNC) and post-TNC, but also pre-1945 colonial cinema, as well as popular cinema between 1955 and 1982.

 

Lim, Song Hwee. “Taiwan New Cinema: Small Nation with Soft Power.” In The Oxford Handbook of Chinese Cinemas. Edited by Carlos Rojas and Eileen Cheng-Yin Chow, 152-169. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.

A good reference book on history, form, and structure of cinema in Taiwan since the emergence of Taiwan New Cinema in the 1980s. The author argues that a dismal domestic production level is no hindrance to a small cinema like Taiwan cinema in achieving global acclaim. It examines a new wave of popular consumption of domestic films and advocates an alternative cinema (“another kind of cinema”) proposed during the Taiwan New Cinema movement.

 

Lu Feiyi (Feii Lu)盧非易. Taiwan dianying: zhengzhi, jingji, meixue 1949~1994 (台灣電影:政治、經濟、美學1949-1994). Taipei: Yuanliu chuban gongsi, 1998.

A scholastic study of Taiwan cinema under the Nationalist rule. Based on the author’s database of more than 400 thousand pieces of information collected from newspapers, government files, and all sorts of literatures. By far the only book-length political and economic analysis of film development in Taiwan based on solid data.

 

Misawa Mamie三澤真美惠. ‘Teikoku’ to ‘sokoku’ no hazama: shokuminchi-ki Taiwan eigajin no kosho to ekkyo (「帝国」と「祖国」のはざま:植民地期台湾映画人の交渉と越境). Tokyo: Iwanami shoten, 2010.

Discusses how Taiwanese engaged in the production, distribution, and exhibition business of cinema by resisting or submitting to the Japanese colonial rule.

 

Misawa Mamie三澤真美惠. Zhimindi xia de “yinmu”: taiwan zongdufu dianying zhengce zhi yanjiu  (殖民地下的「銀幕」:台灣總督府電影政策之研究 [1895-1942]). Taipei: Qianwei chubanshe, 2001.

Based on the author’s master thesis, the book is a scholarly study of the film policies of the Japanese colonial government. Its main foci are film censorship, educational and propagandistic usage of film by education and police agencies. A chapter is dedicated to the overviews of Taiwan cinema under Japanese colonial rule. Another chapter discusses the 16 fiction films made in this period.

 

Udden, James. “Taiwan.” In The Cinema of Small Nations. Edited by Mette Hjort and Duncan Petrie, 144-159. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007.

Taiwan cinema is among the 12 small national or “sub-national” cinemas analyzed in the anthology. A detailed and informative study of institutional and textual issues related to Taiwan cinema.

 

Wen Tianxiang (Wen Tien-hsiang)聞天祥. Guoying: 1992-2011 taiwan dianying zonglun (過影:1992-2011台灣電影總論). Taipei: Shulin chuban gongsi, 2012.

A year-by-year review of Taiwan cinema between 1992, when it was at its lowest point, and 2011, when a revival took place in its domestic market. A useful source of information for understanding the development of Taiwan cinema in the 1990s and 2000s.

 

Yang, Jeff. Once Upon a Time in China: A Guide to Hong Kong, Taiwanese, and Mainland Chinese Cinema. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2003.

The writer takes a journalistic look at some 300 Chinese films, especially martial arts and action movies made in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

 

Zhang, Yingjin, ed. A Companion to Chinese Cinema. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.

One of the Wiley-Blackwell “Companions to National Cinemas Series,” this book is one of the few encyclopedia on Chinese (including Taiwan) cinemas. Two articles on Taiwan cinema of the early 1970s and the 1990s respectively are included. A survey of Chinese (Taiwan included) film scholarship in Chinese-language is of value to anyone conducting research on Taiwan cinema. 

 

Zhang, Yingjin. Chinese National Cinema. New York: Routledge, 2004.

The book dedicates one of its eight chapters completely to Taiwan cinema from 1896 to 1978, and sections of two other chapters to Taiwan cinema 1979-1989 and 1990-2002 respectively. Some useful statistics on ticket prices, production costs and revenues, movie theaters and annual attendance, annual feature production, as well as salary comparison are provided.

 

Zhang, Yingjin and Xiao Zhiwei, eds. Encyclopedia of Chinese Films. London: Routledge, 1998.

This encyclopedia provides entries on directors, genres, themes, actors and actresses from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, as well as 250 film synopses, with a substantial historical overview of Chinese cinemas.

 

 

2. HISTORY

Baskett, Michael. The Attractive Empire: Transnational Film Culture in Imperial Japan. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2008.

One of the few English-language books available for reference on Taiwan cinema during the Japanese colonial period between 1895 and 1945. Baskett briefly discusses film activities in colonial Taiwan and compares them with those of Korea (Chosen) and Manchuria (Manchukuo), two other Japanese colonies until 1945.

 

Du Yunzhi杜雲之. Zhonghua minguo dianying shi (中華民國電影史). 2 vols. Taipei: Xingzhengyuan wenhua jianshe weiyuanhui, 1988.

Before writing this monograph Du had published several versions of Chinese film history based on the Nationalist government’s political stance. Du 1988 is his last and updated version of ROC film history, which includes a film history of Chinese Republic (1896-1949), pro-KMT film activities in Hong Kong (1945-1983), as well as cinema in Taiwan under both the Japanese and the KMT rules (1901-1983). Some of its material on the history of the Chinese Republic is actually based on Cheng Jihua, Li Shaobai, and Xing Zuwen’s Zhongguo dianying fazhan shi, with its communist views deleted. The more valuable contribution of this book to the understanding of Taiwan film history is its description of the development of Taiwan cinema after 1949.

 

Huang Ren黃仁, and Wang Wei王唯, eds.Taiwan dianying bainian shihua (臺灣電影百年史話). 2 vols. Taipei: Zhonghua yingpingren xiehui, 2004.

Huang and Wang take a journalistic approach in presenting Taiwan film history from 1899 to 2001 without adhering to KMT’s traditional view of history, which considers Chinese film history from 1896 to 1949 part of ROC’s film history. This book includes updated and useful information regarding the development of film culture during the Japanese colonial rule and the KMT rule between 1945 and 1949. The book, used in conjunction with Du 1988, can give the readers a picture of how the Nationalist regime first controlled and later promoted filmmaking and film exhibitions in Taiwan. It also includes valuable chapters on animation, cinematographers, film education, Golden Horse Awards, and international coproductions.

 

Ichikawa Sai市川彩. “Taiwan eiga jigyo hattatsu shiko”(臺灣映畫事業發達史稿)In Ajia eiga no sozo oyobi kensetsu (アジア映畫の創造及建設). Ichikawa Sai, 86-98. Tokyo: Kokusai eiga tsushinsha, 1941.

Considered the first book to imagine an “Asian cinema” and calling for a regionalization of film history, Ichikawa’s book includes a chapter on the development of Taiwan cinema under Japanese colonial rule. It is also the first essay on Taiwan film history and the major source of information for Lu 1961 in its discussions of Taiwan cinema in the Japanese period (1901-1945). The point of view of Ichikawa towards Taiwan film history is, of course, pro colonial government and pro Japanese expansionism. However, the information and statistics quoted in it is useful in understanding the development of Taiwan cinema under the Japanese rule.

 

Lee, Daw-Ming. “Introduction.” In Historical Dictionary of Taiwan Cinema. Daw-Ming Lee, 1-33. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2013.

Based on new findings of the author from years of original research through primary sources, this essay brings new facts or details to the history of Taiwan cinema, and offers a comprehensive overview of Taiwan cinema from its inception to the present. This article is also available through *academia.edu website[https://www.academia.edu/4377262/A_Brief_History_of_Taiwan_Cinema]*.

 

Lu Sushang呂訴上. “Taiwan dianying shi 臺灣電影史” InTaiwan dianying xiju shi (A History of Cinema and Drama in Taiwan 臺灣電影戲劇史). Lu Su-Shang, 1-156. Taipei: Yinhua chubanbu (Yin hwa publishing department), 1961.

Before 2000 this book was a source widely quoted by writers of Taiwan film history from local and abroad. This book approaches history of Taiwan cinema from an industrial point of view. Its description of Taiwan cinema under Japanese colonial rule is mostly based on material from Ichikawa 1941. In a journalistic style the author describes the development of Taiwan cinema under KMT rule. It should be read side by side with Du 1988, Huang and Wang 2004, and Lu 1998 to reach a comprehensive and accurate historical understanding of Taiwan cinema in the second half of the 20th century.

 

 

3. GUIDES TO SOURCES AND REFERENCES

PRINTED RESOURSES

Cai Chonglong蔡崇隆, ed. Ai han qing chou jilupian: taiwan zhongshengdai jilupian daoyan fangtanlu (愛恨情仇紀錄片:臺灣中生代紀錄片導演訪談錄). Taipei: Tongxi wenhua chuban gongzuoshi, 2009.

A collection of in-depth interviews conducted by the Taipei Documentary Filmmakers’ Union with 12 independent documentarians active in Taiwan in the 1990s and 2000s. Diversified styles of these documentarians encompass the full spectrum from pure observational to pure experimental. Indispensable if one wants to understand documentary film scene in Taiwan in the past two decades.

 

Dianying ziliaoguan benguo dianyingshi yanjiu xiaozu電影資料館本國電影史研究小組. Lishi de jiao zong: taiying wushi nian (歷史的腳踪:「台影」五十年). Taipei: Guojia dianying ziliaoguan (Chinese Taipei Film Archive), 1996.

The outcome of part of its efforts in salvaging disappearing Taiwan film history, this book contains interviews with leaders, producers, writers, directors, and technicians of Taiwan Film Studio, the first government-run film studio in Taiwan after WWII that produced newsreels, documentaries, and feature films. Still images, posters, and synopses of most of its feature films as well as two project proposals of its earliest productions are included. This book can be read together with Lee and Wang 2000 to get a fuller picture of how a government-affiliated studio is managed in earlier period of KMT rule in Taiwan.

 

Huang Jianye (Edmond Wong)黃建業, ed. Kua shiji Taiwan dianying shilu 1898-2000 (The Chronicle of Taiwan Cinema 1898-2000跨世紀臺灣電影實錄1898-2000). 3 vols. Taipei: Xingzhengyuan wenhua jianshe weiyuanhui & Guojia dianying zilianguan, 2005.

An annotated chronology of Taiwan cinema between 1898 and 2000. It also includes 18 articles to provide overviews of various aspects of Taiwan cinema.

 

Jiao Xionbing (Peggy Chiao Hsiung-ping)焦雄屏, ed. Taiwan dianying 90 xin xin langchao (New New Wave of Taiwan Cinema 90’s 臺灣電影90新新浪潮). Taipei: Maitian chuban, 2002.

A collection of synopses of and commentaries on outstanding Taiwan films made in the 1990s. Includes filmographies of film directors, actors, and important technicians. A list of production companies and a list of Taiwan films awarded or selected in international film festivals are also included.

 

Lee, Daw-Ming (Li Daoming). Historical Dictionary of Taiwan Cinema. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2013.

Currently the only dictionary on Taiwan cinema available in any language, this book covers the history of Taiwan cinema during both the Japanese colonial period (1895-1945) and Chinese Nationalist period (1945-present). Includes a chronology, an introductory essay, bibliography, and more than one hundred cross-referenced entries on directors, producers, performers, films, studios, and genres.

 

Li Daoming (Daw-Ming Lee) 李道明and Wang Weici (Weitsy Wang)王慰慈, eds. Jilu Taiwan: Taiwan jilupian yu xinwenpian yingren koushu (紀錄台灣:台灣紀錄片與新聞片影人口述). 2 vols. Taipei: Guojia dianying ziliaoguan (Chinese Taipei Film Archive), 2000.

A collection of interviews with 19 newsreels filmmakers associated with government-affiliated film studios as well as 19 independent Taiwan documentary filmmakers active in the 1970s and 1980s. An important source for understanding the development of Taiwan documentary film history.

 

Lin Wenchi林文淇 and Wang Yuyan王玉燕, eds. Taiwan dianying de shengyin: fangying zhoubao vs Taiwan yingren  (The Voice of Taiwan Cinema台灣電影的聲音:放映週報 VS 台灣影人). Taipei: Shulin chuban gongsi, 2010.

A collection of 26 interviews conducted by the net film magazine Fangying Zhoubao (Funscreen Weekly) between 2005 and 2010 with Taiwanese fiction and documentary feature directors and other filmmaking personnel. A good source of information for understanding post-Taiwanese Second Wave cinema.

 

Lin Mucai (Wood Lin)林木材. Jingkuang zhi wai: taiwan jilupian qunxiang (景框之外:台灣紀錄片群像).Taipei: Yuanliu chuban gongsi, 2012.

Outcome of an extension project of Cai 2009.Instead of publishing the interviews directly, this book rewrites the interviews into more readable portraits of six young documentarians active in the 2000s but left out in Cai 2009.

 

Lu Feiyi (Feii Lu)盧非易, ed. Taiwan dianying jishi chugao 1949-1994 (台灣電影紀事初稿1949-1994). Taipei: Xingzhengyuan xinwenju zhonghuaminguo dianying nian zhiweihui, 1994.

A year-by-year chronology of Taiwan cinema between 1949 and 1994 published by the Executive Committee of the National Film Year under the Government Information Office of the Executive Yuan, the state department of Taiwan government.

 

Lu Feiyi (Feii Lu)盧非易, ed. Taiwan dianying yanjiu ji wenxian chuban gaikuang 1949-1994 (台灣電影研究及文獻出版概況1949-1994). Taipei: Xingzhengyuan xinwenju zhonghuaminguo dianying nian zhiweihui, 1994.

Another publication of the Executive Committee of the National Film Year, this book provides overviews of books, periodicals articles and essays, newspapers reports and articles, as well as theses and dissertations on Taiwan cinema published in Taiwan between 1949 and 1994. A complete bibliography is also included in this monograph.

 

Taiwan dianying nianjian (Taiwan Cinema Yearbook台灣電影年鑑). Taipei: Chinese Taipei Film Archive.

Regularly published by the Taiwan government since 1969, Taiwan Cinema Yearbook was renamed from Zhonghuaminguo dianying nianjian (Cinema in the Republic of China Year Book中華民國電影年鑑) in 2005. Now edited by the Taiwan Film Institute, current issues of Taiwan Cinema Yearbook regularly include feature articles on fiction and documentary films in the past year, domestic film market analysis, interviews with featuring filmmakers, synopses of domestic productions in the past year, a chronology, and an obituary. Since 2006 a list of recipients of government subsidies, a list of film festival accepted and awarded films, film law and regulations, a list of film companies and associations, and a list of movie theaters are included only in the accompanying CD-ROM.

 

Wang Yunyan王昀燕, ed. Zhi shang fangying: tan kan taiwan daoyan benshi (Paper Projection: Interviews with Taiwan Film Directors紙上放映:探看台灣導演本事). Taipei: Shulin chuban gongsi, 2014.

Second anthology of interviews conducted and published by the web film magazine Funscreen, this book introduces 40-some young Taiwan filmmakers. A good source book for understanding Taiwan cinema between 2010 and 2014.

 

Zhang Changyan (Chang Chang-Yan)張昌彥 and Li Daoming (Daw-Ming Lee)李道明, eds. Taiwan jilupian yanjiu shumu yu wenxian xuanji (台灣紀錄片研究書目與文獻選集). 2 vols. Taipei: Guojia dianying ziliaoguan (Chinese Taipei Film Archive), 2000.

Published by the Chinese Taipei Film Archive (now Taiwan Film Institute), this book includes bibliographies of books, journal articles, thesis and dissertations, as well as pamphlets on subjects related to documentary written in Chinese or Japanese and published in Taiwan since 1930s.

 

Zhong Qiao鍾喬, ed. Dianying suiyue zongheng tan (電影歲月縱橫談). 2 vols. Taipei: Guojia dianying ziliaoguan (Chinese Taipei Film Archive), 1994.

Reflecting the efforts of the Chinese Taipei Film Archive (now Taiwan Film Institute) in preserving Taiwan film culture and film history, these two volumes include brief introductions to, interviews with, and filmographies of 20 producers, writers, directors, cinematographers, and actors once active in Taiwan movie circle from 1950s to 1970s.

 

WEB RESOURCES

*Hong Kong Movie Database[www.hkmdb.com]*

Contains a quite complete database for searching Taiwan film titles.

 

*MCLC Resource Center – Media[http://u.osu.edu/mclc/bibliographies/media/general/]* and *MCLC Resource Center – Media[http://u.osu.edu/mclc/bibliographies/media/resources/]*

These two websites provide bibliographies of Chinese cinemas (including Taiwan cinema) in both general and resources categories.

 

*Taiwan Cinema website [http://www.taiwancinema.com/EN]*

Operated by the Bureau of Audiovisual and Music Industry in the Ministry of Culture, it is the most resourceful website for information regarding current Taiwan cinema.

 

*Taiwan’s Movie Guide [http://www.taiwanderful.net/guides/taiwan-s-movie-guide]*

A website that provides information on certain Taiwan films of the past decade, with links to film reviews and trailers.

 

 

4. ANTHOLOGIES

Berry, Chris, ed. Chinese Cinema: Critical Concepts in Media and Cultural Studies. London: Routledge, 2013.

A dozen of articles on topics related to Taiwan cinema were included in this 4-volume anthology on Chinese cinema that covers History, Film Production and Reception, Genre and Gender, as well as Directors and Their Films. Among articles related to Taiwan cinema four are on historical backgrounds before and after Taiwan New Cinema, one on the practice of cultural translation in colonial Taiwanese cinematic space, one on the change of distribution and exhibition environment in Taiwan during the 1990s and early 2000s, and the rest are on the films of Hou Hsiao-hsien, Edward Yang, Tsai Ming-liang, and Ang Lee.

 

Berry, Chris, ed. Perspectives on Chinese Cinema. 2d ed. London: British Film Institute, 1991.

A pioneering work on new cinemas from China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan written by scholars across nations. Only one article on the differences between Hong Kong and Taiwan cinemas is relevant in this book.

 

Browne, Nick, Paul G. Pickowicz, Vivian Sobchak, and Esther Yau, eds. New Chinese Cinema: Forms, Identities, Politics. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Two articles on Taiwan masters Edward Yang and Hou Hsiao-hsien respectively are included in this early work on new cinemas from PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

 

Lim, Song Hwee and Julian Ward, eds. The Chinese Cinema Book. London: BFI, 2011.

It collected essays on the cinemas of PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Two articles are of relevance to Taiwan cinema: one on Healthy Realism and Mandarin cinema (1964-1980), another on Taiwan New Cinema and post-TNC films. Second generation auteurs Ang Lee and Tsai Ming-liang’s films are discussed. A short bibliography of book-length studies of Chinese cinema in the English language is included.

 

Lu, Tonglin. Confronting Modernity in the Cinemas of Taiwan and Mainland China. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

This book analyzes paradigmatic films of Taiwan and Mainland China to illustrate differences in the experience of modernity in both countries.

 

Lu, Sheldon H., and Emilie Yueh-Yu Yeh, eds. Chinese-Language Film: Historiography, Poetics, Politics. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2005.

This book contains three essays on the politics of cultural and national identity in the films of Hou Hsiao-hsien, Stan Lai, and Ang Lee.

 

Neri, Corrado and Kirstie Gormley, eds. Taiwan Cinema/Le cinéma taiwanais. Lyon: Asiexpo Edition, 2009.

A publication that accompanied the 15th Lyon Asian Film Festival’s “Focus on Taiwan Cinema,” this anthology consists of essays on various topics, such as Taiwan New Cinema, contemporary documentaries, Aborigine cinema, identity crisis, as well as the films of Hou Hsiao-hsien and Tsai Ming-liang.

 

Zhang Changyan (Chang Chang-Yan)張昌彥 and Li Daoming (Daw-Ming Lee)李道明, eds. Taiwan jilupian yanjiu shumu yu wenxian xuanji (台灣紀錄片研究書目與文獻選集). 2 vols. Taipei: Guojia dianying ziliaoguan (Chinese Taipei Film Archive), 2000.

Includes articles, written in (or translated from Japanese into) Chinese language, on the history, aesthetics, government policies and practices, filmmakers, and the production, distribution, exhibition, promotion as well as criticisms of Taiwan documentaries, ethnographic films, newsreels, and propaganda films made under both Japanese and the Nationalist rules. An important source for the studies of Taiwan nonfiction films before 2000.

 

 

5. FILMOGRAPHIES

Kawase Kenichi川瀨健一, ed. Shokuminchi taiwan te shoei te sareta eiga mokuroku: 1899 (meiji 32) nen-1934 (showa 9) nen (植民地 台湾上映でれた映画目錄1899 (明治32)1934 (昭和9)). Nara, JP: Toyo shiso kenkyujo (Oriental Thought Society), 2010.

Kawase Kenichi川瀨健一. Shokuminchi taiwan te shoei te sareta eiga mokuroku: 1935 (showa 10 nen)~1945 (showa 20 nen) (植民地 台湾上映でれた映画目錄1935 (昭和十年)~1945 (昭和二十). Nara, JP: Toyo shiso kenkyujo (Oriental Thought Society), 2010.

Kawase Kenichi川瀨健一. Shokuminchi taiwan te shoei te sareta eiga yogahen: 1899 (meiji 32 nen)~1945 (showa 20 nen) (植民地 台湾上映でれた映画 洋画篇 1899 (明治32)~1945 (昭和20). Nara, JP: Toyo shiso kenkyujo (Oriental Thought Society), 2010.

Each of these 3 volumes of film catalogues contains information about Japanese or foreign films actually screened in Taiwan between 1899 and 1945, mostly shown in theaters, and some in other locations such as open spaces on the street or in front of temples. Each entry contains film titles in Japanese language, screen dates, names of the director and main cast. Indispensable for studying the history of Taiwan cinema under Japanese colonial rule.

 

Li Daoming (Daw-Ming Lee)李道明, ed. Feijuqingpian quan pianmu (非劇情片全片目). 2 vols. Taipei: Guojia dianying zilianguan, 2002.

A complete filmography of nonfiction films collected in the Chinese Taipei Film Archive (renamed Taiwan Film Institute in 2013).

 

Li Daoming (Daw-Ming Lee)李道明, ed. Juqingpian quan pianmu (劇情片全片目). Taipei: Guojia dianying zilianguan, 2002.

A complete filmography of fiction films collected in the Chinese Taipei Film Archive (renamed Taiwan Film Institute in 2013).

 

Liang Liang梁良, ed. Zhonghuaminguo dianying yingpian shangying zongmu (中華民國電影影片上映總目). 2 vols. Taipei: Dianying tushuguan, 1984

An early filmography published by the Taiwan Film Library (renamed Chinese Taipei Film Archive in 1989), it includes a list of Chinese films (including those from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Mainland Chinese films imported before 1950) that had actually screened in Taiwan movie theaters between 1949 and 1982. Each entry contains information about the film title, genre, production company, screen dates in Taipei, as well as names of the director, writer, main cast, and cinematographer.

 

Lu Feiyi (Feii Lu)盧非易, ed. Taiwan song jian yingpian ji duanpian pianmu 1949-1994(台灣送檢影片暨短片片目1949–1994). Taipei: Xingzhengyuan xinwenju zhonghuaminguo dianying nian zhiweihui, 1994.

A publication of the Executive Committee of the National Film Year, it provides a complete filmography of Taiwanese feature and short films that had applied to the censorship board of the Taiwan government for inspection between 1949 and 1994.

 

Wang Weici (Weitsy Wang)王慰慈, Li Daoming (Daw-Ming Lee)李道明, Zhang Chanyan (Chang Chang-Yan)張昌彥, and Lu Feiyi (Feii Lu)盧非易, eds. Taiwan Xinwen/Jilupian pianmu (台灣新聞/紀錄片片目). 2 vols. Taipei: Xingzhengyuan wenhua jianshe weiyuanhui & Guojia dianying zilianguan, 2000.

Published by the Chinese Taipei Film Archive under the auspices of the Council for Cultural Affairs of the Taiwan government, this book contains a filmography of newsreels and documentaries made in Taiwan between 1907 and 2000.

 

 

6. JOURNALS

Dianying xinshang xueshu qikan (Film Appreciation Academic Journal / FaAj電影欣賞學術期刊)

Published by the Taiwan Film Institute (formerly Chinese Taipei Film Archive), FaAj is currently the only Chinese-language academic journal (almost) totally devoted to the study of Taiwan cinema. Most of its articles are under anonymous peer-review.

 

Dianying xinshang (Film Appreciation / Fa電影欣賞)

Another journal published by the Taiwan Film Institute. It contains both academic and non-academic articles on either Taiwan or foreign cinemas.

 

Journal of Chinese Cinemas

One of the few English-language academic journals that frequently focuses on Taiwan cinema. JCC is published three times a year by Intellect since 2007. The second issue of JCC was a special issue on Tsai Ming-liang, and Vol. 4, No. 1 (2010) was on Taiwan films made during the “missing period” (i.e. 1949-1979) in Taiwan cinema studies, between the relocation of KMT’s central government to the island of Taiwan and the emergence of Taiwan New Cinema.

 

Asian Cinema

The publication of the Asian Cinema Studies Society, Asian Cinema occasionally publishes scholarly articles on Taiwan cinema. Vol. 25, No. 1 (2014) was a special issue on the revival of traditional genres and the industry’s renaissance in Taiwan cinema.

 

Osian’s Cinemaya (formerly Cinemaya: The Asian Film Quarterly)

Published in India, Osian’s Cinemaya provides extensive coverage of Asian films. 15th issue (April/June 1992) of Cinemaya was a special issue on Taiwan cinema. Network for the promotion of Asian Cinema (NETPAC), an organization closely related to Cinemaya, published an anthology Asian Film Journeys: Selections from Cinemaya edited by Rashmi Doraiswamy and Latika Padgaonkar, in which three articles feature films from Taiwan and an interview with Hou Hsiao-hsien are included.

 

*Senses of Cinema [http://sensesofcinema.com/]*

An online film journal that from time to time presents articles on Taiwan cinema.

 

*Taiwan Panorama [www.taiwanpanorama.com.tw/]*

An online database that offers articles from the Taiwan government-owned Taiwan Panorama magazine, which publishes many articles on Taiwan cinema annually.

 

 

7. ANIMATION

Chen Yijing (Yvonne Chen)陳怡菁. Donghua chuangyi xianchang: taiwan donghua daoyan mingzuo da jiexi (動畫創意現場:台灣動畫導演名作大解析). Taipei: Ruguo chuban she, 2009.

Introducing 43 (mostly) young animation directors under 40-year-old and their representative works. A good source book for understanding recent Taiwan animation productions. Some of these animators are also featured in Huang 2008.

 

Huang Guoli黃國禮, ed. Hua Donghua:zhuan fang 29 wei donghua daoyan yingyin chuangyi dangan (Let’s Animation話動畫:專訪29位動畫導演影音創意檔案). Tainan, Taiwan: Nantai keji daxue shijue chuanda sheji xuexi, 2008.

An English-Chinese bilingual book consisted of interviews with 29 young Taiwanese animation directors. A useful source book for understanding the works of young Taiwan animators emerged in the first decade of the 21st century. This book can be used in conjunction with Chen 2009.

 

*Lee, Daw-Ming. “A Brief History of Animated Film in Taiwan”[https://www.academia.edu/4377961/A_Brief_History_of_Animated_Film_in_Taiwan]*

An overview of the development of Taiwan animation from mid-1950s to the 2000s.

 

Lent, John A. Animation in Asia and the Pacific. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2001.

Based on his years’ of research and interviews, the author provides useful, though a bit dated, information regarding the animation scene in Taiwan.

 

Shi Changjie (C. Jay Shih). Zhu ge zao meng: Taiwan donghua lishi, jilu yu lunshu (Pursuing Dreams Frame by Frame: A History of the Taiwanese Animation Industry逐格造夢:台灣動畫歷史、紀錄與論述). Taipei: Taibei shi wenhuaju, 2010.

Based on the author’s TV documentary series on the history of Taiwan animation, this monograph discusses the content and creating process of that TV series. Taiwan animation industry was divided into four periods: the birth in the 1970s, the dilemma of domestic vs. outsourced production in the 1980s, industrial migration period of the 1990s, and crises and opportunities of international competition in the 2000s.

 

Shiau, Hong Chi. Animating the Cute, the Mean and the Beautiful: The Production and Consumption of Animation: Taiwan's Struggles in the Age of Globalization. Saarbrücken, Germany: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller, 2008.

Based on the author’s research for his Ph.D. dissertation, this book discusses how Taiwan’s animation industry tries in vain to produce animation features in the digital age to move upwards along the value chain.

 

Shiau, Hong Chi. “The Production and Consumption of Animation in Taiwan: The Interplay of Global Political and Economic Forces.” Ph.D. diss., Temple University, 2002.

Examines how global political and economic forces influence the development of Taiwan animation industry.

 

Shiau, Hong Chi, and John A. Lent. “Taiwan’s Cuckoo’s Nest and the New Labor Situation.” In Asian Cinema 14:1 (Spring/Summer 2003), 90-106.

An article on the transition of world’s biggest animation company Wang Film Production into an outsourcing animation studio in the 1990s.

 

 

8. DOCUMENTARY

Chen, Pin-chuan. “A Critical History of Taiwanese Independent Documentary.” Ph.D. diss., Goldsmiths, University of London , 2014. 

This thesis divides the history of Taiwanese independent documentary into four periods and put an emphasis on the development of independent documentary productions in the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s following drastic changes in the social and political circumstances.

 

Chiu, Kuei-fen, and Yingjin Zhang. New Chinese-Language Documentaries: Ethics, Subject and Place. London: Routledge, 2015.

Dealing with both independent documentary in Mainland China and new Taiwan documentary since the 1980s. The book discusses issues of ethics, subjectivities, and migration in the documentaries from both areas. A must-read for anyone interested in Taiwan Cinema/Taiwan Documentary studies.

 

Guo Lixin (Kuo Li-hsin)郭力昕. Zhenshi de kouwen: jilupian de zhengzhi yu qu zhengzhi (真實的叩問:紀錄片的政治與去政治). Taipei: Maitian chuban, 2014.

A collection of documentary film criticisms written by the author in the past 10 years. Kuo takes into account how filmmakers of documentary politicizing or problematizing material they dealt with and criticizes films that patronize their audience or exploit their subjects.

 

Kuo, Yen-Ting. “Social Responsibility and Aesthetics: The Function of Documentary Filmmaking in Contemporary Taiwan.” Ph.D. diss., Griffith University, Australia, 2013.

Based on interviews with 9 documentary filmmakers, this dissertation explores the achievements and changing social function of documentary in Taiwan since the lift of martial law in 1987.

 

Li Chen李晨. Guangying shidai: dangdai Taiwan jilupian shi lun (光影时代:当代台湾纪录片史论). Beijing: Shehui kexue wenxian chubanshe (Social Sciences Academic Press), 2014.

The most complete and updated book on the history of Taiwan documentary to date. Based on comprehensive literatures research and actual studying of recent documentary films, this book traces the development of Taiwan documentary from the first film commissioned by the colonial government in 1907 to the burgeoning new Taiwan documentary filmmaking in the 2000s. A good introduction to the history of Taiwan documentary for anyone interested in the subject.

 

Lin, Sylvia Li-chun and Tze-Lan Deborah Sang, eds. Documenting Taiwan on Film: Issues and Methods in New Documentaries (2012), London: Routledge, 2012.

An anthology of articles dealing with various issues such as historical representation, ethics, and styles. A good introduction to various ways in which new Taiwan documentaries engaged with contemporary social, cultural, or political issues. The topics discussed include configuring Taiwaneseness, narrative innovations of young documentarians, reflexivity and documentary ethics, representing political and social dissent, as well as the oversentimentalism and depoliticization of mainstream Taiwan documentaries.

 

Li Daoming (Daw-Ming Lee)李道明. Lishi, jiyi, zaixian yu jilupian  (History, Memory, Representation and Documentary Film歷史、記憶、再現與紀錄片). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie (台灣紀錄片美學系列), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2008.

Liao Jinfeng (Liao Gene-fon)廖金鳳. Taiwan jilupian “qianshi”: jishi yingxiang, jiating dianying dao jilupian (A Pre-history of Taiwanese Documentary Filmmaking: Actualities, Home Movie and Documentary台灣紀錄片前史;紀實影像、家庭電影到紀錄片) In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie (台灣紀錄片美學系列), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2008.

Lin Baoyuan林寶元. Jieyan hou chuqi jilupian de zai sikao: meixue guandian de zai sikao (Hegemony and the Aesthetic of Taiwan Documentary Film in the Early Post-Martial Law Era解嚴後初期紀錄片的再思考:美學觀點的再思考). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie (台灣紀錄片美學系列), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2008.

Wang Weici (Weitsy Wang)王慰慈. Jilu yingxiang meixue zhong de ziwo duihua: jieyu zhenshi/xugou, jilu/xiju zhi jian (Video-Dialogue with One Self in the Aesthetics of Documentary Films: Between Truth and Fiction, Between Documentary and Drama紀錄影像美學中的自我對話:介於真實/虛構、紀錄/戲劇之間). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie (台灣紀錄片美學系列), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2008.

Wen Tianxiang (Wen Tien-hsiang)聞天祥. Si mi shidai: wo he wo de…(Private Me Time: I and MY…私˙Me時代:我和我的…). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie (台灣紀錄片美學系列), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2008.

The five booklets listed here are from the “Taiwan Documentary Aesthetic Series” a documentary film program sponsored by the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art, organizer of the bi-annual Taiwan International Documentary Festival. Representing the program curated by each author, these booklets contain introduction to each program, information of films screened in the program, and transcripts of several Q&A sessions conducted after screenings. The booklets as a whole can be used as secondary material for exploring various issues of, and approaches to, Taiwan documentary, including historical documentary, early home movies and documentaries, mainstream documentary approaches, reenactment and dramatization, personal and autobiographical documentary.

 

Guo Lixin (Kuo Li-hsin)郭力昕. Zhuti de jilu he jilu de zhuti: jian lun jilupian “yeyu meixue” de zhengzhi xing (The Documentation of Subject and the Subject of Documentation: the Political Nature of the “Amateur Aesthetics” of Documentary Films主體的紀錄和紀錄的主體-兼論紀錄片「業餘美學」的政治性). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. 2009 Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie  er (2009台灣紀錄片美學系列[二]), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2010.

Li Yongquan (Lee Yung-chuan)李泳泉. Jilupian shuo shemo? Jilupian zenmo shuo? Jilupian de xushi celue yu xingshi kaoliang (What to say and how to say it? Documentaries: narrative strategies and formal considerations紀錄片說什麼?紀錄片怎麼說?:紀錄片的敘事策略與形式考量). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. 2009 Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie  er (2009台灣紀錄片美學系列[二]), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2010.

Lin Baoyuan林寶元. Zhimin yu qu zhimin: jieyan hou taiwan jilupian zhong de shehui lishi yishi yu meixue yishi (Colonization and Decolonization: Social, Historical, and Aesthetic Consciousness in Taiwan’s Documentary Films in the Post-Martial Law Era殖民與去殖民:解嚴後台灣紀錄片中的社會歷史意識與美學意識). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. 2009 Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie  er (2009台灣紀錄片美學系列[二]), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2010.

Qiu Guifen (Kuei-fen Chiu)邱貴芬. Keji yu lunli (Technology and Ethics科技與倫理). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. 2009 Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie  er (2009台灣紀錄片美學系列[二]), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2010.

Wei Di (Wei Ti)魏玓. Jilu qingchun: kuse, zhengzha yu chengzhang (Recording Youth: bitterness, struggle and growth紀錄青春:苦澀、掙扎與成長). In Chen Shusheng陳樹升, ed. 2009 Taiwan jilupian meixue xilie  er (2009台灣紀錄片美學系列[二]), Taizhong: Guoli taiwan meishuguan (National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art), 2010.

Representing the second series of documentary film program sponsored by the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Art, the five booklets listed here deals with documentary forms, ethics, subjectivities, political and social consciousness, as well as films about youths. English text of introduction to each program is available in these booklets.

 

 

9. DIRECTORS AND FILMS

Berry, Chris, ed. Chinese Films in Focus II. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.

An expanded edition of the editor’s previous anthology Chinese Films in Focus: 25 New Takes. It includes chapters that detail important Taiwan films, such as Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Flowers of Shanghai and A Time to Live, A Time to Die, Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Wedding Banquet, Tsai Ming-liang’s Vive L’Amour, Edward Yang’s Yi Yi, King Hu’s A Touch of Zen,.and two more lesser known films from Taiwan – Formula 17 and The Personals.

 

Berry, Michael, ed. Speaking in Images: Interviews with Contemporary Chinese Filmmakers. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005.

This book includes dialogues with Taiwan masters Hou Hsiao-hsien (and his writing partner Chu Tien-Wen), Edward Yang, Ang Lee, Tsai Ming-liang, as well as lesser-known directors Wu Nianzhen (Wu Nien-Jen) and Zhang Zuoji (Chang Tso-Chi).

 

Browne, Nick, Paul G. Pickowicz, Vivian Sobchack, and Esther Yau, eds. New Chinese Cinemas: Forms, Identities, Politics. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

This book includes two chapters on the films of Taiwan masters Edward Yang and Hou Hsiao-hsien respectively.

 

Chow, Rey. Sentimental Fabulations, Contemporary Chinese Films: Attachment in the Age of Global Visuality. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007.

Rey Chow uses two chapters to approach Ang Lee’s The Wedding Banquet and Tsai Ming-liang’s The River from multiple perspectives.

 

Eleftheriotis, Dimitris, and Gary Needham, eds. Asian Cinemas: A Reader & Guide. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2006.

An introduction and three chapters on the authorship of Hou Hsiao-hsien, Edward Yang, and Ang Lee are included in this anthology.

 

Lu, Sheldon Hsiao-peng, ed. Transnational Chinese Cinemas: Identity, Nationhood, Gender. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1997.

Lu’s pioneering anthology contains three chapters exploring topics related to the films of Taiwan directors Hou Hsiao-hsien, Ang Lee, and Stan Lai.

 

Lu, Sheldon H., and Emilie Yueh-Yu Yeh, eds. Chinese-Language Film: Historiography, Poetics, Politics. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2005.

This book contains several chapters on Taiwan director Hou Hsiao-hsien’s films, post-Taiwan New Cinema films, Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Wu Nien-Jen’s Dou-san, and one on feminine writing in Taiwan cinema.

 

Ma, Jean. Melancholy Drift: Marking Time in Chinese Cinema. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2010.

The book spends four of its five chapters on the art films of Taiwan masters Hou Hsiao-hsien and Tsai Ming-liang.

 

Yeh, Emilie Yueh-yu, and Darrell William Davis. Taiwan Film Directors: A Treasure Island. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005.

One of the few book-length studies on Taiwan film history and its directors available in English-language. The book focuses on post-World War II Taiwan film history, with an emphasis on Taiwan New Cinema, especially directorial styles and film forms of its four masters.

 

CAI MINGLIANG (TSAI MING-LIANG)

Huang, Erin Yu-Tien. “Capital’s Abjects: Chinese Cinemas, Urban Horror, and the Limits of Visibillity.” Ph.D. diss., University of California, Irvine, 2012.

The study of post-1980s urban cinemas based in China, Taiwan, and the Chinese diasporic center of Kuala Lumpur. Tsai Ming-liang’s works are the bases for an interdisciplinary transnational noir urbanism approach to the study of urban marginality.

 

Lim, Song Hwee. Tsai Ming-liang and a Cinema of Slowness. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2014.

An examination of Tsai Ming-liang’s films through the aesthetics of slowness.

 

Ma, Jean. “Tsai Ming-liang’s Haunted Movie Theater.” in Global Art Cinema: New Theories and Histories. Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover, eds., 334-350. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.

Ma’s article argues that the intertextuality found in Tsai’s later films set him apart from the filmmakers of ‘Taiwan New Cinema and makes him an art cinema filmmaker who appropriated, reworked, and subsumed to a citational stance postmodernism.

 

*Neri, Corrado. “Past Masters, New Waves: Tsai Ming-liang / François Truffaut.Transtext(e)s Transcultures 1 (2006): 64-79.[doi: 10.4000/transtexts.183][http://transtexts.revues.org/183]*

The author uses Tsai Ming-liang’s films to examine contemporary Taiwanese art cinema’s strategy to re-appropriate, analyze, parody, and reflect on its tradition, its legacy, and its influence.

 

Palmer, Augusta L. “Crossroads: Nostalgia and the Documentary Impulse in Contemporary Chinese Cinemas.” Ph.D. diss., New York University, 2004.

Examines industrial, aesthetic, and thematic convergences in urban cinema made in late 1990s in the PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Content and style of Tsai Ming-linag’s films are compared with Zhang Yuan’s from PRC as well as Wong Kar-wai’s and Fruit Chan’s from Hong Kong.

 

Rehm, Jean-Pierre, Oliver Joyard, and Danièle Rivière. Tsai Ming-liang. Paris: Dis Voir, 1999.

The first book dedicated to the work of Tsai Ming-liang. It consists of two articles, many stills, and a long interview with Tsai.

 

Sun Songrong孫松榮. Rujing/chujing: Cai Mingliang de yingxiang yishu yu kuajie shiyan (Projecting Tsai Ming-liang: Towards Transart Cinema入境/出境:蔡明亮的影像藝術與跨界實驗). Taipei: Wunan tushu chuban gongsi, 2014.

This book deals with Tsai’s constant experiments with moving images, from television to film, from realism to the aesthetics of plastic art, from film to modern art, from cinema to art gallery, and explores the process of his transformation from a film director to an artist.

 

Wen Tianxiang聞天祥. Guangying dingge: Cai Mingliang de xinling changyu (光影定格:蔡明亮的心靈場域). Taipei: Hengxing guoji wehua gongsi, 2002.

The first Chinese-language book to discuss Tsai’s film career. It also devotes five chapters in in-depth analysis of Tsai’s five films.

 

HOU XIAOXIAN (HOU HSIAO-HSIEN)

Bordwell, David. Figures Traced in Light: On Cinematic Staging. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2005.

One chapter is devoted to the discussion of the style of Hou Hsiao-hsien’s films in this book on staging and style written by the famous neoformalist film scholar.

 

Frodon, Jean-Michel, and Olivier Assayas. Hou Hsiao-hsien. Paris: Cahier du Cinema, 1999.

An anthology of articles on Hou’s films written mostly by famous French writers, with additional articles by Japanese scholar Shiguehiko Hasumi and Taiwan’s film critic Peggy Chiao.

 

Lin Wenqi, Shen Xiaoyin, and Li Zhenya, eds. Xi meng shiguang: Hou Xiaoxian dianying chengshi, lishi, meixue (戲夢時光:侯孝賢電影城市、歷史、美學). Taipei: Taiwan Film Institute, 2014.

A continuation of the editors’ previous book on the poetics of Hou’ cinema (Lin, Shen, and Li 2000). This anthology concentrates on analyzing the use of sound, color, viewpoints, production design, and editing in Hou’s films.

 

Lin Wenqi, Shen Xiaoyin, and Li Zhenya, eds. Xi lian rensheng: Hou Xiaoxian dianying yanjiu (戲戀人生:侯孝賢電影研究). Taipei: Maitian chuban, 2000.

An early anthology of articles written by Taiwan film scholars (and two translations of essays by American scholars Nick Browne and June Yip) on the poetics of Hou’s cinema.

 

Nornes, Abé Nornes, and Emilie Yueh-yu Yeh. Staging Memories: Hou Hsiao-hsien’s A City of Sadness. Ann Arbor, MI: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2015.

The authors offer an updated study of Taiwan New Cinema director Hou Hsiao-hsien’s masterpiece. The book analyzes Hou’s cinematic style and the complex manner used to render history. This book is a revised version of the authors’ previous web 1.0 hypertext analysis of A City of Sadness.

 

Silbergeld, Jerome. Hitchcock with a Chinese Face: Cinematic Doubles, Oedipal Triangles, and China's Moral Voice. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2004.

Silbergeld spends one of three chapters of his book on the use of metaphoric imagery in Hou’s Good Men, Good Women.

 

Suchenski, Richard I., ed. Hou Hsiao-hsien. Vienna: SYNEMA – Gesellschaft für Film und Medien, 2014.

The first English-language anthology on Hou’s works. It contains an introduction by the editor, 13 articles written by film critics, scholars, and directors across three continents, an interview with the master and his scriptwriter Chu Tien-wen, as well as interviews with, or articles written by, Hou’s collaborators – cinematographers, editor, sound designer, production designer, scriptwriter, and actor.

 

Udden, James. No Man an Island: The Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2009.

A book-length study on Hou’s film style and its relationship with the industrial and cultural context in which these films are made.

 

Zhu Tianwen (Chu Tien-wen)朱天文. Zui hao de shiguang: hou xiaoxian dianying jilu (最好的时光:侯孝贤电影记录). Shandong: Shandong huabao chubanshe, 2006.

Written by Hou Hsiao-hsien’s long-time collaborator, this book contains six original short stories Hou’s films were based on, eight screenplays, and articles written by the author on her working experiences with the director. A rare insider’s look at the master’s filmmaking concepts and working methods.

 

HU JINQUAN (KING HU)

Bordwell, David. “”Richness Through Imperfection: Kin Hu and the Glimpse.” In The Cinema of Hong Kong: History, Arts, Identity. Edited by Poshek Fu and David Desser, 113-136. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Bordwell analyzes King Hu’s visual style, especially in his magnificent fight scenes.

 

Hu Weiyao胡維堯, ed. Hu jinquan tan dianying (胡金銓談電影). Hong Kong: Sanlian shudian (Joint Publishing), 2011.

An anthology of articles written by King Hu on his own films, other film masters, etc. The book includes Hu’s two screenplays – Xia Nu (A Touch of Zen) and Longmen Kezhan (Dragon Inn).

 

Huang Ren黃仁. Hu jinquan de shijie (胡金銓的世界). Taipei: Yatai tushu chubanshe, 1999.

A journalistic description of King Hu’s life and film career.

 

Liang, Bingjun梁秉鈞, et al. Hu Jinquan de yishu shijie (胡金銓的藝術世界).Taipei: Yuesheng wenhua shiye gongsi, 2007.

A collection of articles written by film critics from Hong Kong and Taiwan on the art of King Hu’s films.

 

Rodriguez, Hector. "Questions of Chinese aesthetics: film form and narrative space in the cinema of King Hu." Cinema Journal 38,1 (Fall 1998): 73-97.

Discusses the cinematic representation of “Chineseness” in Hu’s films.

 

Teo, Stephen. King Hu’s A Touch of Zen. The New Hong Kong Cinema Series. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2007.

A detailed study of King Hu’s A Touch of Zen, the first Chinese-language (martial arts) film to win an award at an international film festival (Cannes). Frequently mistaken as a Hong Kong production, the film was actually made in Taiwan for a Taiwan-based film company.

 

Yamada Koichi山田宏一, Udagawa Yukihiro宇田川幸洋, and Hu Jinquan胡金銓. King hu: bukyo den’ei saho (A Touch of King Huキン・フー武侠電影作法). Tokyo: Soshisha, 1997.

A book consisted mainly of an exhaustive interview with King Hu on his autobiography, his film career, as well as his friendships with other film masters. A complete filmography of King Hu and synopsis of each film were included.

 

LI AN (ANG LEE)

Arp, Robert, Adam Barkman, and James McRae, eds. The Philosophy of Ang Lee. The University of Kentucky Press, 2013.

An anthology that examines Ang Lee’s films from both Eastern and Western philosophy angles.

 

Cheshire, Ellen. Ang Lee.. Harpenden, UK: Pocket Essentials, 2001.

An accessible guide to Ang Lee’s films from early Taiwan productions to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

 

Dilley, Whitney Crothers. The Cinema of Ang Lee: The Other Side of the Screen. London: Wallflower Press, 2007.

An overview of the career of Ang Lee and his films.

 

Mo Wa墨娃and Fu Huimin付会敏. Yuedu li an (Reading Ang Lee閱讀李安). Beijing: Beijing daxue chubanshe (Peking University Press), 2008.

A textual analysis of Ang Lee’s films from Tuishou / Pushing Hands (1991) to Se Jie / Lust, Caution (2008).

 

Peng, Hsiao-yen, and Whitney Crothers Dilley, eds. From Eileen Chang to Ang Lee: Lust/Caution. New York: Routledge, 2014.

An anthology of articles dealing with Eileen Chang’s original text and Ang Lee’s adaptation of Lust/Caution. The book explores the novel/film from three aspects: (1) adaptation, (2) eros, subjectivity, and collective memory, and (3) identity politics and global cultural economy.

 

Xie Caimiao謝彩妙. Xunzhao qingmingjian: cong wohucanglong tan huayu dianying guojihua (Globalization of Chinese Language Cinemas: A Case Study of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon尋找青冥劍:從《臥虎藏龍》談華語電影國際化). Taipei: Yatai tushu chubanshe, 2004.

The author uses Michael Porter’s Diamond model to analyze how and why Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was able to break into North American market.

 

Ye Jigu葉基固. Li an dianying de jing yu biaoda: cong wenben, wenhua dao kua wenhua (Frame Imagery Expression in Ang Lee’s Films: From Text, Culture to Cross-culture李安電影的鏡語表達:從文本、文化到跨文化).Taipei: Xinrui wenchuang, 2012.

An analysis of Ang Lee’s films from the angles of textual analysis, Chinese culture, cross-culture, and commercial aesthetics.

 

LI HANXIANG (LI HAN-HSIANG)

Jiao Xionbing (Peggy Chiao Hsiung-ping)焦雄屏. Li Hanxiang: taiwan dianying (chanye) de kaituo xianfeng (李翰祥:臺灣電影[產業]的開拓先鋒). Taipei: Yuesheng wenhua shiye gongsi, 2007.

An overview of Li’s film career and achievements during his short stay in Taiwan in the 1960s.

 

Jiao Xiongbing (Peggy Chiao Hsiung-ping)焦雄屏. Guolian dianying yanjiu: gaibian lishi de wu nian (國聯電影研究:改變歷史的五年). Taipei: Wangxiang tushu gongsi, 1993.

The first Chinese-language book to deal with the rise and fall of Guolian studio, the first private funded modern film studio started by Li Han-hsiang who helped establish the mandarin-speaking film industry in Taiwan in the 1960s.

 

Li Hanxiang李翰祥. Yinhai qianqiu (銀海千秋). Tianshang renjian xilie 1 (天上人間系列1). Hong Kong: Tiandi tushu gongsi (Cosmos Books), 1997

Li Hanxiang李翰祥. Yinhe shangxia (銀河上下). Tianshang renjian xilie 2 (天上人間系列2). Hong Kong: Tiandi tushu gongsi (Cosmos Books), 1997

Li Hanxiang李翰祥. Yingcheng neiwai (影城內外). Tianshang renjian xilie 3 (天上人間系列3). Hong Kong: Tiandi tushu gongsi (Cosmos Books), 1997

Li Hanxiang李翰祥. Yintan wangshi (銀壇往事). Tianshang renjian xilie 4 (天上人間系列4). Hong Kong: Tiandi tushu gongsi (Cosmos Books), 1997.

Sequels to Li’s memoir (Li 1983) with anecdotes of his personal film experiences in Taiwan.

 

Li Hanxiang李翰祥. Sanshi nian xi shuo congtou (三十年細說從頭). 4 vols. Hong Kong: Tiandi tushu gongsi (Cosmos Books), 1983.

Li’s memoir that deals with mostly his film careers and experiences in Hong Kong with anecdotes of his personal observations on the film personalities in Taiwan.

 

Wong, Ain-ling, ed. Li Han-hsiang, Storyteller. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Film Archive, 2007.

Consists of articles on Li’s films, including one on his Chinese opera films made in Taiwan, as well as interviews with Li’s friends and colleagues in Taiwan.

 

YANG DECHANG (EDWARD YANG)

Anderson, John. Edward Yang. Urbana-Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2005.

An overview of Edward Yang’s film career and his films.

 

Chang, Bryan張偉雄, and Li Cheuk-to李焯桃, eds. The One and Only Edward Yang (Yi yi zhongxian Yan Dechang 一一重現楊德昌). Hong Kong: Hong Kong International Film Festival Society, 2008.

A publication accompanying the 32nd Hong Kong International Film Festival’s special tribute to Yang. This bilingual booklet contains interviews with Yang, Yang’s short stories, essays on Yang, and film notes of Yang’s films.

 

Frodon, Jean-Michel. Le cinema d’Edward Yang. Paris: Editions de l’éclat, 2010.

An in-depth analysis of Edward Yang’s film career and his films. This book also includes articles written by Yang and international filmmakers and film critics.

 

Huang, Erin Yu-Tien. “Capital’s Abjects: Chinese Cinemas, Urban Horror, and the Limits of Visibillity.” Ph.D. diss., University of California, Irvine, 2012.

The study of post-1980s urban cinemas based in China, Taiwan, and the Chinese diasporic center of Kuala Lumpur. Edward Yang’s Terrorizer is used to address the question of gender in Taiwan cinema in the 1980s.

 

Huang Jianye (Edmond Wong)黃建業. Yang Dechang dianying yanjiu: taiwan xin dianying de zhixing sibianjia (楊德昌電影研究:台灣新電影的知性思辨家) Taipei: Yuanliu chuban gongsi, 1995.

The first Chinese-language book to discuss Edward Yang and his films. It also contains a long interview with Yang and a bibliography.

 

Marchetti, Gina. From Tiananmen to Times Square: Transnational China and the Chinese Diaspora on Global Screens, 1989-1997. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2006.

The book includes an interview with Edward Yang.

 

Wang, Yunyan王昀燕, ed. Zaijian yang dechang: Taiwan dianying ren fangtan jishi (Edward Yang Revisited: Interviews with Taiwanese Filmmakers再見楊德昌:臺灣電影人訪談紀事).Taipei: Shizhou wenhua shiye gongsi, 2012.

The book consists of 16 interviews with friends, colleagues, actors, crew members, and students of Edward Yang.

 

ZHANG CHE (CHANG CHEH)

Wei Junzi魏君子, ed. Wuxia da zongshi zhang che (武俠大宗師張徹). Hong Kong: Sanlian shudian (Joint Publishing), 2012.

A collection of journalistic articles reviewing Chang Cheh’s film career and films made in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

 

Wong, Ain-ling, Kwok Ching-ling and May Ng, eds. Chang Cheh: A Memoir. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Film Archive, 2004.

A memoir written by the Hong Kong martial arts action film master himself. Useful in understanding his film career in Taiwan between 1949 and 1957, and between 1974 and 1976.

 

Zhang Che (Chang Cheh)張徹. Zhang Che: Huiyilu, yingping ji (張徹:回憶錄Ÿ影評集). Hong Kong: Xianggang dianying ziliaoguan (Hong Kong Film Archive), 2002.

The Chinese-language version of Chang Cheh: A Memoir. Additional writings and film reviews written by Chang on Hong Kong, Chinese, Japanese, and Hollywood productions are included.

 

Zhang Che (Chang Cheh)張徹. Zhang Che Jin zuo ji 1986-88 (張徹近作集:一九八六-八八). Hong Kong: Mingchuang chubanshe, 1988.

Part one of this booklet includes a collection of articles written by Chang Cheh on his Taiwan experience working for Chiang Ching-kuo, son of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, as well as his personal observations on the filmmaking circle in Shanghai and Hong Kong. Part two is consisted of his observations on cultural and political developments in China in the 1980s.

 

 

10. FILM STARS

Farquhar, Mary and Yingjin Zhang, eds. Chinese Film Stars. New York: Routledge, 2010.

The book examines ethnic Chinese film stars, including Taiwan’s Brigitte Lin and Lee Kang-sheng.

 

Rawnsley, Ming-Yeh T. “Stars as Production and Consumption: A Case Study of Brigitte Lin.” In East Asian Film Stars. Edited by Leung Wing-Fai and Andy Willis, 190-204. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

The author examines how Brigitte Lin’s star image was produced and consumed in Taiwan and Hong Kong before and after the abolition of martial law in Taiwan in 1987. She also ponders what can be learnt from Brigitte Lin’s stardom about the film industry and film culture in Taiwan and Hong Kong.

 

Tetsuya, Akiko. The Last Star of the East: Brigitte Lin Ching Hsia and Her Films. Los Angeles, CA: Akiko Tetsuya, 2005.

This is a book of interviews with Brigitte Lin, a Taiwan and Hong Kong superstar of the 1970s-1990s, and her friends and filmmakers in both areas. The author is Lin’s big fan.

 

 

11. GENDER

Chen Mingzhu陳明珠, and Huang Yunqi黃勻祺, eds. 2010 Taiwan nu daoyan yanjiu: ta, juqingpian, tanhualu (2010台灣女導演研究:她Ÿ劇情片Ÿ談話錄). Taipei: Xiuwei zixun keji gongsi, 2010.

A Chinese-language anthology of eight articles written by film scholars or graduate students on female directors and their works in post-Taiwan New Cinema era.

 

Chen, Ya-chen. Women in Chinese Martial Arts: Films of the New Millennium: Narrative Analyses and Gender Politics. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012.

Chen focuses her book on narrative analyses of gender politics and investigates how feminist the Chinese martial arts films of the 21st century are. One chapter is devoted to discussing Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

 

Lim, Song Hwee. Celluloid Comrades: Representations of Male Homosexuality in Contemporary Chinese Cinema. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2006.

Lim explores gay films in China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, and engendering conditions in those areas. Male homosexuality in films made by Ang Lee and Tsai Ming-liang are discussed.

 

Martin, Fran. Backward Glances: Contemporary Chinese Cultures and the Female Homoerotic Imaginary. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010.

Fran Martin examines representations of erotic and romantic love between women in popular films, fiction, and TV drama in Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

 

Martin, Fran. Situating Sexualities: Queer Representation in Taiwanese Fiction, Film and Public Culture. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2003.

The author discusses the queer subject matter represented in several Taiwanese films, including Ang Lee’s The Wedding Banquet and Tsai Ming-liang’s The River.

 

Wang, Lingzhen, ed. Chinese Women's Cinema: Transnational Contexts. New York: Columbia University Press, 2011.

Two articles on Taiwanese women directors/writers Sylvia Chang and Chu Tien-Wen are included. Another article on the films of post-Taiwan New Cinema women directors is translated from an article in Chen and Huang 2010.

 

Zhao, Tinghui趙庭輝. Xushi dianying yu xinbie lunshu (Narrative Cinema and Gender Discourse敘事電影與性別論述). Taipei: Huayi shuwei gongsi (Airiti Press), 2010.

Two chapters are devoted respectively to the discussion of female consciousness and gender image among the young in two Taiwan films made in early 2000s.

 

 

12. GENRE

Cai, Guorong蔡國榮. Zhongguo jindai wenyi dianying yanjiu (中國近代文藝電影研究). Taipei: Zhonghuaminguo dianying tushuguan chubanbu, 1985.

A pioneer work on wenyipian, a Chinese melodrama genre popular in Hong Kong and Taiwan since the 1950s. Films and directors famous for this genre are discussed. An early publication of the Chinese Taipei Film Archive (now Taiwan Film Institute).

 

Chen, Ya-chen. Women in Chinese Martial Arts: Films of the New Millennium: Narrative Analyses and Gender Politics. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012.

From a feminist perspective this book analyzes, among other Chinese martial arts films of the new millennium, the narrative of the love stories of three female protagonists in Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. King Hu’s two earlier award-wining martial arts films are also discussed.

 

Hu, Brian. “Worldly Desires: Cosmopolitanism and cinema in Hong Kong and Taiwan.” Ph.D. diss., University of California, Los Angeles, 2011.

This Ph.D. dissertation examines the role cinema played in helping Taiwan (and Hong Kong) make sense of the emotional challenges by the seemingly imminent arrival of globalization. “Overseas students in love” in Taiwan’s propagandistic family melodramas of 1970s was discussed.

 

Szeto, Kin-Yan. The Martial Arts Cinema of the Chinese Diaspora: Ang Lee, John Woo, and Jackie Chan in Hollywood. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2011.

This book examines how Ang Lee, like Jackie Chan and John Woo, embodies and deploys cosmopolitical perspective in his martial arts film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

 

Teo, Stephen. Chinese Martial Arts Cinema: The Wuxia Tradition. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2009.

This book includes one chapter each on the wuxia martial arts films of Chang Cheh (Zhang Che) and King Hu (Hu Jinquan).

 

Ye Yueyu (Emilie Yueh-Yu Yeh) 葉月瑜. Gesheng meiying: gequ xushi yu zhongwen dianying (Phantom of the Music: Song Narration and Chinese-language Cinema歌聲魅影歌曲敘事與中文電影). Taipei: Yuanliu chuban gongsi, 2000.

The author explores the use of popular songs in Chinese-language films. Four chapters are devoted to the discussion of the synergy between music and film in genres such as Healthy Realism and policy film. Pop rock music as a form of postcoloniality and diaspora in Edward Yang’s A Brighter Summer Day is also discussed.

 

13. INDUSTRY AND MARKET

Curtin, Michael. Playing to the World's Biggest Audience: The Globalization of Chinese Film and TV. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007.

It partially explores Hollywood’s dominance over Taiwan cinema, as well as the commercial ventures into film and television by billionaire Koo Chen-fu and aspiring billionaire Chiu Fu-sheng.

 

Hu, Brian. “Worldly Desires: Cosmopolitanism and cinema in Hong Kong and Taiwan.” Ph.D. diss., University of California, Los Angeles, 2011.

In the last chapter of this Ph.D. dissertation Hu analyzes the ways state representatives of Taiwan (and Hong Kong) conjure the idea of the local industry on the world stage as a means of self-branding in a competitive market.

 

Lee, Daw-Ming. “A Preliminary Study of the Market for Documentaries in Taiwan.” Asian Cinema 20.2 (Fall/Winter 2009): 68-82.

An analysis of production costs, box office figures, TV ratings, and audience sizes of theatrical feature-length documentaries and TV documentaries. A preliminary conclusion was reached which precludes the possibility of establishing a documentary industry in Taiwan.

 

Lent, John. The Asian Film Industry. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990.

This book provide useful, though a bit dated, information regarding the Taiwan film industry.

 

*Rosen, Stanley. “Hollywood, Globalization and Film Markets in Asia: Lessons for China?” Keynote speech delivered at Globalization and Film and TV in Asia Conference, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, 21-24 November 2002.[http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic152447.files/rosen_Hollywood.pdf]*

The paper examines Hollywood’s strategy and the responses from film markets in Korea, India, Japan, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Taiwan is considered the least successful case in terms of how its government and film industry responded to the Hollywood challenge. Though the information provided in this paper is a bit dated, it may still be useful as an archival document for researchers interested in the topic.

 

Xie Caimiao謝彩妙. Xunzhao qingmingjian: cong wohucanglong tan huayu dianying guojihua (Globalization of Chinese Language Cinemas: A Case Study of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon尋找青冥劍:從《臥虎藏龍》談華語電影國際化). Taipei: Yatai tushu chubanshe, 2004.

A case study to explore the strategies used in promoting, marketing and exhibiting Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon in North American market.

 

 

14. NATIONAL IDENTITY

Berry, Chris, and Mary Farquhar. China on Screen: Cinema and Nation. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2006.

The authors propose using a framework of cinema and the national to study “transnational Chinese cinemas.” Films of Taiwan directors Hu Jinquan (King Hu), Li Xing (Lee Hsing), Hou Hsiao-hsien, and Ang Lee are discussed.

 

Hong, Guo-Juin. Taiwan Cinema: A Contested Nation on Screen. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

A study of colonial and postcolonial nationalisms in pre-1945 colonial Taiwan cinema, popular cinema between 1955 and 1982, as well as films by directors of Taiwan New Cinema and beyond, such as Hou Hsiao-hsien, Wang Tong, and Tsai Ming-liang.

 

Hu, Brian. “Worldly Desires: Cosmopolitanism and cinema in Hong Kong and Taiwan.” Ph.D. diss., University of California, Los Angeles, 2011.

This Ph.D. dissertation argues that cinema in Taiwan (and Hong Kong) played a critical role in imagining her place in the world during decades in which the idea of belonging and identity was under duress. The dissertation concludes that cinema is especially useful for a “non-nation” like Taiwan to participate in a politics of positionality unavailable through diplomatic channels.

 

Lu, Sheldon Hsiao-peng, ed. Transnational Chinese Cinemas: Identity, Nationhood, Gender. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1997.

This pioneering anthology contains three chapters exploring topics related to the films of Taiwan directors Hou Hsiao-hsien, Ang Lee, and Stan Lai. June Yip analyzes the issue of the “national” identity in Hou’s “Taiwan Trilogy.” Jon Kowallis examines the representation of the “transnational identity” of Chinese in Lai’s Peach Blossom Land. Dariotis and Fung explore the issues of subject position, identity politics, and multiculturalism in Lee’s films.

 

Ma, Sheng-Mei. “Trauma and Taiwan’s Melodrama: Seven Orphans of Cape No. 7.” In Transnational Asian Identities in Pan-Pacific Cinemas: The Reel Asian Exchange. Edited by Philippa Gates and Lisa Funnell, 205-219. New York: Routledge, 2012.

In this anthology that examines the exchange of Asian identities during the production and exhibition of pan-Pacific cinemas, the interplay between cultural trauma (orphanhood) and melodrama in Taiwan’s melodramatic hit movie Cape No. 7 is explored in Ma’s essay. The author argues that melodrama displaces trauma in Taiwan’s consciousness.

 

Tan, See-Kam, Peter X. Feng, and Gina Marchetti. Chinese Connections: Critical Perspectives on Film, Identity, and Diaspora. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009.

Three articles on the films of Edward Yang, Ang Lee, and Tsai Ming-liang are included in this anthology.

 

Wicks, James. Transnational Representations: The State of Taiwan Film in the 1960s and 1970s. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2014.

In this book about the lesser known period in Taiwan film history, the author analyzes plot, theme, language, and genre innovations of representative films in the golden age of the 1960s and 1970s directed by prominent directors such as Li Xing, Bai Jinrui, and Song Cunshou. The book argues that the internal and external struggles Taiwan experienced in its search for global identity is revealed in these films.

 

Yip, June. Envisioning Taiwan: Fiction, Cinema, and the Nation in the Cultural Imaginary. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.

Drawing from various critical discourses, such as historiography, literary and film criticism, and political cultural studies, Yip explores how the rhetoric of nation was produced, manipulated, and transformed in the Taiwanese cultural imaginary. Yip gives us a picture of Taiwanese cultural identity and nationhood through close readings of the works of nativist writer Hwang Chun-ming (Huang Chunming) and Taiwan New Cinema filmmaker Hou Hsiao-hsien.

 

 

15. TAIWAN NEW CINEMA AND AFTER

Berry, Chris, and Feii Lu, eds. Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2005.

An anthology on the career of major Taiwan New Cinema (TNC) filmmakers in the 1980s, such as Hou Hsiao-hsien, Edward Yang, and Wang Tong, as well as their important works. The book also discusses filmmakers who came after TNC (sometimes called the “Second New Wave”), including Wu Nian-Jen (A Borrowed Life), Tsai Ming-liang (Vive L’Amour), Ang Lee (Eat Drink Man Woman and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), and lesser-known Chang Tso-Chi (Darkness and Light).

 

Chen, Ru-Shou Robert陳儒修. Taiwan xin dianying yanjiu: Taiwan xin dianying de lishi wenhua jingyan (台灣新電影研究:台灣新電影的歷史文化經驗) Taipei: Wanxiang tushu gongshi, 1993.

Based on the author’s Ph.D. dissertation, the book is one of the earliest book-length works in any language on the historical and cultural meanings of the Taiwan New Cinema.

 

Chiao, Peggy Hsiung-ping 焦雄屏, ed. Taiwan xin dianying (台灣新電影). Taipei: Shibao wenhua chuban gongsi, 1988.

A pioneering anthology on the emergence, historical and political contexts, effects, as well as aesthetics of Taiwan New Cinema and its filmmakers.

 

Davis, Darrell William and Ru-Shou Robert Chen, eds. Cinema Taiwan: Politics, Popularity and State of the Arts. New York: Routledge, 2007.

An anthology concentrates on post-TNC films and filmmakers, who, unlike their predecessors in TNC, are fragmented, multifaceted, and sometimes in conflict with each other. The book does not discuss aesthetics nor does it analyze film forms of post-TNC cinema (termed Cinema Taiwan, as in the title of the anthology); rather the authors use various approaches to investigate issues such as nonfiction and independent filmmaking, identity politics, gender and sexuality, and community activism.

 

Lu, Tonglin. Confronting Modernity in the Cinemas of Taiwan and Mainland China. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

An early cultural study of the experience of modernity and modernization in the new wave cinema in Taiwan and China. Cultural formation is considered a major factor in both the differences in their reactions to modernity and how cultural identity has taken different forms in the two areas.

 

Tweedie, James. The Age of New Waves: Art Cinema and the Staging of Globalization. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

It examines the origins of the concept of the “new wave” in 1950s France and then focuses on the new cinemas emerged in Taiwan and Mainland China during the 1980s and 1990s. “Cinema of mise en scène,” a crucial but overlooked tendency in new wave film, is considered a key aesthetic strategy in the global success of directors like Hou Hsiao-hsien, Tsai Ming-liang, and Jia Zhangke.

 

Wilson, Flannery. New Taiwanese Cinema in Focus: Moving Within and Beyond the Frame. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2014.

Though the monograph offers a concise history of Taiwanese national cinema, the focus is on the textual readings of specific films by Hou Hsiao-hsien, Edward Yang, Tsai Ming-liang, Ang Lee, and other emerging young directors. The author emphasizes the “hybridity” and “adaptation” (intertextuality, citation, and translation) quality in their films.

 

Yip, June. Envisioning Taiwan: Fiction, Cinema, and the Nation in the Cultural Imaginary. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.

Yip examines the specific historical and cultural contexts underlying the phenomenon of Taiwan New Cinema and finds the ideological significance of the themes and strategies of the new cinema films differ drastically from practices in earlier modes of filmmaking in Taiwan.

 

 

16. TAIWANESE-DIALECT FILM

Dianying ziliaoguan koushu dianyingshi xiaozu電影資料館口述電影史小組. Taiyupian shidai (yi) (台語片時代[一]). Taipei: Guojia dianying ziliaoguan (Chinese Taipei Film Archive), 1994.

Published by the Chinese Taipei Film Archive, the book is a pioneer work on Taiwanese-dialect film (TDF). Includes collections of still images, interviews with writers and directors, as well as synopses of Taiwanese-dialect films available in the Chinese Taipei Film Archive and an incomplete.filmography of TDF.

 

Huang Ren黃仁. Beiqing taiyupian(悲情台語片). Taipei: Wanxiang tushu gongshi, 1994.

A journalistic description of the development of Taiwanese-dialect film (TDF), its filmmakers (producers, directors, writers, actors), and important films. With an appendix of TDF filmography more complete than the one published by the Chinese Taipei Film Archive.

 

Liao Jinfeng (Liao Gene-fon)廖金鳳. Xiaoshi de yingxiang: taiyupian de dianying zaixian yu wenhua rentong (消逝的影像:台語片的電影再現與文化認同). Taipei: Yuanliu chuban gongsi, 2001.

The author takes Taiwanese-dialect film (TDF) as a form of representation of mass culture’s social practice and uses semiotics and discourse analysis to discuss the development (and implications) of TDF from its primitive state through transitional to the ultimate mature state, which, the author argues, was influenced by the narrative style of classical Hollywood cinema.

 

Ye Longyan葉龍彥. Chun hua meng lou: zhengzong taiyu dianying xingshuai lu (春花夢露:正宗台語電影興衰錄). Taipei: Boyang wenhua gongsi, 1999.

Based on Huang 1994 and Chinese Taipei Film Archive’s pioneering studies, Ye provides another journalistic descriptive analysis of Taiwanese-dialect film (TDF). With a TDF filmography not very different from the one published by the Chinese Taipei Film Archive.

 

 

17. TRAUMA

Berry, Michael. A History of Pain: Trauma in Modern Chinese Literature and Film. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008.

This book examines the representation of six historical traumas in modern Chinese history. Taiwan’s “Musha Incident” of 1930 and “228 Incident” of 1947 are discussed in conjunction with that of the Rape of Nanjing in 1937-38, the Cultural Revolution in 1966-76, the June Fourth Incident in 1989, and the Hand-Over of Hong Kong in 1997. Cinematic representations of the Musha Incident in He Jiming’s Qingshan Bixie / Bloodshed on the Green Mountains (1957) and Hong Xinde’s Wushe fengyun / Disturbance in Musha (1965), as well as the representation of the 228 Incident in Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Beiqing chengshi / A City of Sadness (1989) and Lin Cheng-sheng’s Tianma Chafang / March of Happiness (1999) are explored. Berry suggests that a new Taiwanese historical subjectivity that could stand separate from the Mainland Chinese master narratives of cultural unity began to emerge in Taiwan.

 

Lin, Sylvia Li-chun. Representing Atrocity in Taiwan: The 2/28 Incident and White Terror in Fiction and Film. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007.

Lin devotes several chapters of this book to discussing Hou Hsiao-hsien’s masterpiece A City of Sadness and his Good Men, Good Women, Lin Cheng-sheng’s March of Happiness, Wan Jen’s Super Citizen Ko, and Hsu Hsiao-ming’s Heartbreak Island.

 

Ma, Sheng-Mei. “Trauma and Taiwan’s Melodrama: Seven Orphans of Cape No. 7.” In Transnational Asian Identities in Pan-Pacific Cinemas: The Reel Asian Exchange. Edited by Philippa Gates and Lisa Funnell, 205-219. New York: Routledge, 2012.

Ma argues that Cape No. 7 shows that Taiwanese yearn to return to Japan, motherland during the colonial rule, in order to avoid trauma repetitively caused by the Japanese taking over of Taiwan from China after winning the first Sino-Japanese War, and the handing over of Taiwan to China after losing the second Sino-Japanese War.